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To Break Or Not To Break?

By: nigel20 , 8:40 PM GMT on March 05, 2015

Negril, Westmoreland is well known as a tourism dependent region. Tourism is a major employer of residents, not to mention the approximately US$ 500 million generated by tourism activities. However, the shoreline is now under threat; attributable to human activity, sea level rise and anomalously high storm activity. As a result, studies have been done to remedy to situation, or halting the precipitous rate of beach erosion.


Over the past year, there have been widespread discussion on plans to build a breakwater to protect the shoreline at the tourism dependent Negril, Westmoreland. Hoteliers, residents and environmental groups have been generally against the building of breakwaters, which is expected to be implemented by the National Works Agency (NWA), under the watch of the National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA). The method that is preferred by the aforementioned stakeholders is Beach nourishment. The argument is that a breakwater would not be aesthetically pleasing, and could result in major economic losses. Let's take a look at what's planned, and the possible alternative.

Breakwater

Breakwaters are considered to be hard structures. Quoting the marine engineering section of the Britannica " a break water is an artificial structure protecting a harbour, anchorage, or marina basin from water waves."

The primary aim of a breakwater is to absorb wave energy and protect a shoreline from erosion. We know from Physics, that energy cannot be created or destroyed. Energy transitions to a different form, or energy transfer between two bodies. We can see the latter while floating in the ocean, waves pass by an individual, but we remain in the same position. Essentially, the water is not moving, but energy is being transferred between water molecules.
I mentioned the above to suggest that a breakwater is best suited for a region with high wave energy. Plus, the breakwater method is relatively inexpensive when compared to beach nourishment.

On the downside, if a fixed breakwater is built, It's considered to be aesthetically displeasing. Construction time is often lengthy, leading to economic losses. Plus, a rock can be displaced during a storm surge.

Beach Nourishment

To understand what's beach nourishment, I'll share a quote by Sea Grant California "Beach Nourishment, or beach replenishment, is the practice of adding sand or sediment to beaches to combat erosion and increase beach width."

Beach Nourishment is generally a preferred option to mitigating beach erosion, this because It's easily implemented. Plus, It is said to be aesthetically pleasing, and allows for natural beach accretion. Additionally, studies have shown that erosion is somewhat slowed during storm activity, if beach nourishment is done properly.

On the downside, beach nourishment is expensive. Marine animals on the beach can be killed, and beach nourishment has to be continuous. In other words, It may not be sustainable, especially if funds are limited.

Conclusion
It's imperative that a solution is found to the ongoing erosion, as failure to find a solution will result in major economic losses to Negril and the entire Jamaica. My view is that, beach nourishment can augment the benefits of a breakwater, instead of having a single method. But let's see what pans out in the coming months, seeing that the breakwater plan was recently approved.


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

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68. BaltimoreBrian
12:59 AM GMT on March 23, 2017
Always glad to post articles here that I think you'll be interested in :)
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67. nigel20
12:26 AM GMT on March 23, 2017
Thanks Brian!
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65. BaltimoreBrian
2:18 AM GMT on March 10, 2017
You're very welcome Nigel :)
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64. nigel20
4:44 AM GMT on March 08, 2017
Wow! Thank you Brian! To say the article you posted be is interesting would be an understatement. However, it's great that the error was discovered.
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63. nigel20
4:37 AM GMT on March 08, 2017
Quoting 61. barbamz:

Nigel, greetings to you in distant Jamaica! Hope we will keep in touch after the WU relaunch, even when our personal blogs are gone. Best wishes!!


Hi Barbara, thanks for visiting. I will. :)
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62. BaltimoreBrian
9:50 PM GMT on March 05, 2017
61. barbamz
12:01 AM GMT on March 05, 2017
Nigel, greetings to you in distant Jamaica! Hope we will keep in touch after the WU relaunch, even when our personal blogs are gone. Best wishes!!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
60. nigel20
6:42 AM GMT on February 24, 2017
Thank you Brian, it was a great article. I hope that studies like the one mentioned in the article will aid in storm forecasts.
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59. BaltimoreBrian
1:59 AM GMT on February 24, 2017
58. nigel20
5:25 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
Not at all Brian, I love reading, it's the best way to expand my knowledge.

You're correct, that's a control room...using DCS (distributed control system) which is found in most plants.
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57. BaltimoreBrian
3:11 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
You're welcome Nigel. I'm very sure you have more knowledge about power engineering as well as instrumentation and control than I do! If those animated graphics are annoying I'll get rid of them. The second graphic depicts instrumentation and control, I think.
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56. nigel20
3:09 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
Interesting article as usual, Brian.

I should reveal that I have greater knowledge on Instrumentation and Control vis a vis Power engineering. :)
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55. nigel20
2:05 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
Quoting 53. BaltimoreBrian:

Nigel, I wonder if a 2°C rise in average temperature in Jamaica would make life without air conditioning intolerable, or nearly so. Perhaps this would help:

New engineered material can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption

I think a 2 degree C rise in temperature would make life without ACs intolerable. Plus, manufacturing of beverage has seen a marked increase in recent times, this trend should continue with an increase in temperature. Though, modern engineering may be able to mitigate against some of the associated negatives of a 2 degree temperature increase.

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54. BaltimoreBrian
12:16 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
How New York City Gets Its Electricity A lengthy but good article







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53. BaltimoreBrian
8:47 PM GMT on February 12, 2017
Nigel, I wonder if a 2°C rise in average temperature in Jamaica would make life without air conditioning intolerable, or nearly so. Perhaps this would help:

New engineered material can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption
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52. nigel20
11:06 PM GMT on February 10, 2017
You'll seldom find ACs in homes here in Jamaica, they are more prevalent in office and businesses. However, a 2°C would surely lead to an increase in the number of homes that would have ACs installed. Data from our local power provider suggests that the average home uses approximately 250 kWh each month. If a 12 000 BTU AC is installed and operated for approximately 6 hours, it would consume in excess of 100 kWh for the month...this, in turn, would definitely increase electricity demand.
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51. BaltimoreBrian
3:15 AM GMT on February 09, 2017
I know that you are studying to be an electrical engineer, so I thought you might find that article interesting. If Jamaica was 2°C warmer than present, how much do you think overall demand electricity demand increase and how much would peak loads increase? Do most people in Jamaica have air conditioning at home?
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50. nigel20
1:50 AM GMT on February 09, 2017
That's an interesting article.
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49. BaltimoreBrian
2:25 AM GMT on February 08, 2017
Electricity costs: A new way they'll surge in a warming world
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48. BaltimoreBrian
5:04 AM GMT on January 31, 2017
You're welcome Nigel--I am well and hope you are too.
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47. nigel20
4:07 AM GMT on January 31, 2017
Thank you Brian, I Hope you are well.
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45. BaltimoreBrian
12:45 AM GMT on January 30, 2017
For this metal, electricity flows, but not the heat: Law-breaking property in vanadium dioxide could lead to applications in thermoelectrics, window coatings Law-breaking? Law-evading, perhaps: a brief filed against the Wiedemann-Franz Law :)

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44. nigel20
3:05 AM GMT on January 27, 2017
Thank you Rick!
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43. Rlh11
8:39 PM GMT on January 20, 2017
Amen, Nigel20, infrequently does a single source solution provide an acceptable anwser to complex problems. having visited the area you are referring to, losing the aesthetic value of the landscape would, in mho, economically devastate the area. Time spent, to develop a multi-option solution, would keep the residents working together and, more than likely maintain the primary industry, tourism, intact, maintaining jobs, cash flow, etc, necessary to support a viable multi-prong response to the problem. Well thought out and spoken.

RickH --Ad Astra per Astra--
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42. nigel20
6:48 AM GMT on January 13, 2017
Thanks for stopping by, Brian...it's great to hear from you.
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41. BaltimoreBrian
10:40 PM GMT on January 05, 2017
Are tiny grazers the new hope for Caribbean reefs?
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40. nigel20
6:35 AM GMT on November 10, 2016
Yes, I'm fine. Plus, 2016 has been the wettest year for Jamaica in over two years. This, in turn, has boosted agriculture and also GDP growth in the last quarter. Though growth is still relatively low, I hope this is the start of possibly more robust growth that will pan out in the medium term.

Now that the US election has been settled, it may very well take some time to unite the country. I had no idea that the US was this divided. However, I hope all will be well sooner rather than later.
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39. BaltimoreBrian
11:25 PM GMT on November 08, 2016
You're welcome Nigel, I am well--hope you are too. I'm looking forward to our election being settled!
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38. nigel20
7:13 PM GMT on November 08, 2016
Thank you Brian, I hope you are well.
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37. BaltimoreBrian
1:57 AM GMT on November 08, 2016
"Sea Unicornes", featured in History of the Carriby Islands, 1666.

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36. BaltimoreBrian
8:29 PM GMT on October 23, 2016
Caribbean heritage under threat: coastal erosion and climate change
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35. BaltimoreBrian
12:50 AM GMT on October 14, 2016
34. BaltimoreBrian
12:50 AM GMT on October 14, 2016
You're welcome Nigel :)
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33. nigel20
6:59 PM GMT on October 13, 2016
Hi Brian. Thanks as usual!
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32. BaltimoreBrian
2:17 AM GMT on October 12, 2016
Jamaican Rock Iguanas Get a Shot at a New Home in the Wild Click photo to expand.

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31. BaltimoreBrian
2:36 AM GMT on October 04, 2016
Good luck Nigel!

Guantanamo Bay radar showing eastern Cuba, extreme western Haiti, and northeastern Jamaica. Updates automatically.

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30. BaltimoreBrian
11:35 PM GMT on August 18, 2016
Life is good Nigel, hope you are well too.
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29. BaltimoreBrian
11:34 PM GMT on August 18, 2016
New green method could unlock bauxite deposits
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28. nigel20
9:39 PM GMT on July 02, 2016
Good to hear from you Brian, I hope you are well.
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27. BaltimoreBrian
12:53 AM GMT on June 22, 2016
26. nigel20
3:10 PM GMT on May 11, 2016
Thanks Brian!
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24. nigel20
6:23 PM GMT on April 20, 2016
Quoting 23. BaltimoreBrian:

Life's been good. It's good to see you--sometimes I look at your previous entries you're slowly filling up with comments :) We'll soon find out if this season will be exciting. I don't like how so many basins have had tropical cyclones of unprecedented strength an behavior in the past couple of years--since Haiyan. I hope Jamaica stays safe another year.

I hope for the same. In the event that we do get a storm, I wish the general public will be prepared.
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23. BaltimoreBrian
12:56 AM GMT on April 20, 2016
Life's been good. It's good to see you--sometimes I look at your previous entries you're slowly filling up with comments :) We'll soon find out if this season will be exciting. I don't like how so many basins have had tropical cyclones of unprecedented strength an behavior in the past couple of years--since Haiyan. I hope Jamaica stays safe another year.
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22. nigel20
12:49 AM GMT on April 20, 2016
Yes, it's working. How have been? I'm busy for the time being, hopefully I'll be able to post more often this upcoming hurricane season.
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20. BaltimoreBrian
1:53 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Yeah that is a pdf paper from the AMS---does that not work for you? I'm thinking about taking that source out of my blog--it seems to have been paywalled.
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19. nigel20
4:29 PM GMT on February 12, 2016
Hey Brian! The the link is taking me to a PDF file.
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18. BaltimoreBrian
3:08 AM GMT on February 12, 2016

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