Parts of Europe Gripped by Cold Snap, Heavy Snow

Sean Breslin
Published: April 21, 2017

A child runs across a meadow covered in fresh snow on Mount Kekesteto, some 50 miles northeast of Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, April 18, 2017.
(Peter Komka/MTI via AP)

Millions of Europeans saw visions of winter in recent days as temperatures plunged and heavy snow fell in several countries.

Nearly a foot of snow was reported in eastern Ukraine by Euronews, while more than a half-foot of wintry precipitation fell in Switzerland. Snowfall was also reported in parts of Germany, Poland, Slovakia and Romania, the report added.

With so many trees in bloom, the weight of the snow was problematic. Trees fell in the Ukranian city of Kharkiv and more than 1,000 homes lost power, Euronews also said.

(MORE: Late-April Cooldown Coming for Parts of U.S.)

The snow also created travel problems in some areas. At least two dozen people were hurt in a 40-car pileup near the Slovakian city of Poprad at about 6 a.m. local time Thursday morning, according to the Associated Press. The collision shut down the main route that connects the eastern part of Slovakia to the capital, Bratislava, the report added.

"A southward dip in the jet stream has kept much of eastern Europe and adjacent parts of Russia in a very cold weather pattern since the weekend," said weather.com meteorologist Chris Dolce. "Low temperatures have been subfreezing at times, allowing snow to fall in the region."

Additional images of the snowstorm can be seen below.

Heavy machinery clears snow from the road near Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Friday, April 21, 2017.
(AP Photo/Amel Emric)

A car drives through the snow in Munich, southern Germany, on April 18, 2017.
(TOBIAS HASE/AFP/Getty Images)

Apple blossoms are covered with ice near Denzlingen, southwestern Germany, Thursday, April 20, 2017.
(Patrick Seeger/dpa via AP)

Freshly fallen snow covers houses in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, southern Germany, on April 19, 2017.
(ANGELIKA WARMUTH/AFP/Getty Images)

A man looks through a scope covered with fresh snow on Mount Kekesteto, the highest, 3,326-foot summit of Hungary, in Matra mountain range, some 50 miles northeast of Budapest, Hungary, Tuesday, April 18, 2017.
(Peter Komka/MTI via AP)

Blooming tulips are covered in snow in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, southern Germany, on April 19, 2017.
(ANGELIKA WARMUTH/AFP/Getty Images)

A duck seeks food on a snow-covered meadow near Aitrang, southern Germany, on April 19, 2017.
(KARL-JOSEF HILDENBRAND/AFP/Getty Images)

A snowman is seen near the level crossing between Wernigerode and Schierke, eastern Germany, on April 19, 2017.
(MATTHIAS BEIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Snow covers tulips near Wolfratshausen, Germany, Tuesday, April 18, 2017.
(AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Signs reading "Now Pick Tulips," left, and "Daffodils," center, stand on a snow-covered hill near Wolfratshausen, Germany, Tuesday, April 18, 2017.
(AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

A man shovels snow from the sidewalk in Budapest, Hungary, Wednesday, April 19, 2017.
(Balazs Mohai/MTI via AP)

Cars are driven through snow near Sarajevo, Bosnia on Tuesday, April. 18, 2017.
(AP Photo/Amel Emric)

MORE: Winter Storm Stella


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

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